PANGILINAN ON PANLILIO: A WELCOME DEVELOPMENT FOR THE REFORM CONSTITUENCY

May 5, 2009

Press Release
March 22, 2009

 

PANGILINAN ON PANLILIO: A WELCOME DEVELOPMENT FOR THE REFORM CONSTITUENCY

 

Independent senator and reforms advocate Francis “Kiko” Pangilinan welcomed the statement of Pampanga Governor “Among Ed” Panlilio that he was “open to taking up the challenge” of building a reform constituency for the country.

 

“We welcome this development for the cause of political reforms in the country. We must seek alternatives to trapo politics and politics as usual, and the initiatives of Panlilio and the Kaya Natin! Organization should be welcomed as we firm up efforts to provide genuine reforms in governance,” Pangilinan said.

 

The reformist senator, who was a student activist during the Marcos regime, strongly urged various sectors to unite in building a reform coalition. He says: “All those who seek to build a reform coalition must come together. All those who are tired of the same old faces must unite and look for a common candidate for reforms. We must build a reform coalition that will challenge the hegemony and dominance of traditional politics. We must seek tirelessly to put an end to this dominance if we are to effect genuine change for the nation.”

 

“Our people are searching for real alternatives to trapo politics,” Pangilinan continued. “We ran as an independent in 2007 because of this clamor for change. People want sweeping reforms and they do not see it happening with the current trapo politics being displayed at the national level. There is widespread public disenchantment towards politicians in general because the country seems to be going nowhere–no thanks to politicians who have failed to lead us out of the mess we are in.”

 

Like many, Pangilinan believes that the 2010 elections is a “make or break” moment for the country. “[The] 2010 [elections] should not be about choosing between the administration or the opposition. That configuration has not worked. 2010 should be about choosing between genuine reforms in politics and governance, or more of the same bankrupt and inutile ‘politics as usual.'”

 

“For genuine change to take place come 2010 and beyond, we must mount an electoral revolt across the nation and overseas and a reform coalition must lead the charge by rallying the people in the grassroots.”

 

“We must build a national reform coalition and offer a real alternative for our people. Now is the time to do it,” he ended.

 

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